Anthony Yacopino, retired investigator with the New York City Police, suffers from PTSD from having to help sift through the rubble after the destruction of the twin towers of the World Trade Center. He spoke at a 9/11 Memorial held at the Candor American Legion.

Anthony Yacopino, retired investigator with the New York City Police, suffers from PTSD from having to help sift through the rubble after the destruction of the twin towers of the World Trade Center. He spoke at a 9/11 Memorial held at the Candor American Legion.

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About 50 people attended the 9/11 Memorial held by the Candor American Legion on Sept. 11 at 9 a.m. in front of the Legion.?

The event started with Legion Commander Mack Riggs thanking everyone for coming. He talked about how everyone seems to remember where they were when they heard about the attack on the World Trade Center and more that day.?

Riggs introduced Pastor Bill Puckey of the McKendree Methodist Church, who led everyone in a prayer, and then a moment of silence was held. He said, “I am proud to be an American,” then went on to talk about God sending a message to America. He said there is too much disregarding the rules of right and decency.?

“I miss the America of 9/12 where Americans were working together, not against each other. I fear if this country continues the way we are we won’t have a nation.”?

Pucky introduced Candor resident Roy Yarrinton, who read a poem, “the Eleventh of September,” by Roger J. Robicheau.?

Next, the song by Alan Jackson, “Where were you?” was heard over the speaker as several in the audience broke down thinking about the words of the song.?

Anthony Yacopino stepped up to the podium and talked about being a resident of Candor since 2013, calling Candor his sanctuary. “If you are here today I am confident you have not forgotten 9/11,” he said.?

Yacopino is a retired investigator with the New York City Police who now suffers from PTSD from helping to sort through the rubble and piles left by the destruction of the twin towers of the World Trade Center.?

His story is not only on a video but also has a chapter in a book titled “We’re Not Leaving,” by Benjamin Luft, MD.?

Yacopino showed the book and talked about the man on the cover, a friend and fellow cop he knew that was also there searching through the rubble. All the proceeds from the sale of the book go to 9/11 families and are actually accounts of those who were there, so it is not an easy read.?

Yacopino also talked about an interview he did which ended up as an article in Newsday about dealing with PTSD. “There is no cure,” he said. “You can only learn mechanisms to cope.”?

“PTSD never goes away. I hear just about every day about another death from the health effects of helping clear the rubble or escaping the terror, even some suicides, unfortunately,” he said

Yacopino reported there have been about 4,300 people who have died since 9/11; there have been 251 deaths in 2021 so far. “My wife has experienced everything with me in real time,” he said.?

Roy Yarrington read a second poem next, titled “We Shall Never Forget,” by Alan Jankowski, and choked up trying to finish reading.?

Next those in attendance could hear Lee Greenwood’s song, “God Bless the USA,” and Pastor Puckey closed with a final prayer.?

Many in attendance took time to give a hug to Yacopino and his spouse.

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